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The 10 most-stolen vehicles in the U.S.

97HondaAccordSE.jpg
According to the National Insurance Crime Bureau, the No. 1 most stolen car is a 1997 Honda Accord. (Image courtesy of American Honda Motor Co.)

Every summer, the National Insurance Crime Bureau publishes a list of the most-stolen vehicles in America for the previous calendar year. This summer is no exception.

As in previous years, the NICB compiled its list by gathering data submitted by law enforcement agencies to the Federal Bureau of Investigation's National Crime Information Center. The NICB's Hot Wheels report contains not only a breakdown of the biggest targets for auto thieves overall, but also a rundown of vehicles from the most recent model year (in this case, 2016) that have proven popular with ne'er-do-wells.

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In both groups, we see that sedans and coupes are the most commonly stolen vehicles in the country. Pickups come in second, with SUVs and crossovers targeted least frequently of all.

Here's a list of the most-stolen vehicles from all model years:

  1. 1997 Honda Accord
  2. 1998 Honda Civic
  3. 2006 Ford Pick-Up (Full Size)
  4. 2004 Chevrolet Pick-Up (Full Size)
  5. 2016 Toyota Camry
  6. 2015 Nissan Altima
  7. 2001 Dodge Pick-Up (Full Size)
  8. 2015 Toyota Corolla
  9. 2008 Chevrolet Impala
  10. 2000 Jeep Cherokee/Grand Cherokee

When we look at just 2016 vehicles, we see some of the same models, though the order shifts a bit:

  1. 2016 Toyota Camry
  2. 2016 Nissan Altima
  3. 2016 Toyota Corolla
  4. 2016 Dodge Charger
  5. 2016 Ford Fusion
  6. 2016 Hyundai Sonata
  7. 2016 GMC Sierra
  8. 2016 Hyundai Elantra
  9. 2016 Ford Pick-Up (Full Size)
  10. 2016 Ford Transit

The NICB takes pains to note that the total number of auto thefts has dropped dramatically since the high-water mark reached in 1992. As an example, the organization points to the number of late-model Honda Accords and Civics stolen--a number that has plummeted thanks to the availability of "smart key" and other anti-theft technology. (For reference, the 2016 Accord was the 16th most-stolen vehicle last year, while the 2016 Civic didn't even make the top 25.)

However, the NICB also notes that anti-theft technology doesn't do anything if owners don't use it--or, for example, if owners leave their keys and/or fobs in their vehicles.

Click here to see the NICB's full report and an interactive map showing the most popular stolen cars by state.

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