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Haley leaves UN Security Council meet as Palestinian envoy’s speaking: report

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U.S. Ambassador to the U.N. Nikki Haley (Credit: U.N. via MGN.).

WASHINGTON (CIRCA) – U.S. Ambassador to the U.N. Nikki Haley recently arrived late for a meeting of the group’s Security Council, according to The Jerusalem Post.

The Post reported Wednesday that Haley then left the event while her Palestinian counterpart Riyad Mansour was speaking.

Tuesday’s event illuminated growing tensions between the U.S. and the Palestinian Authority over this week’s violence in Gaza.

Israeli Ambassador to the U.N. Danny Dannon was also late to the meeting, which came a day after protests in Gaza turned violent.

Haley ultimately blamed Hamas for the carnage, which the group’s health ministry reported resulted in the death of more than 60 Palestinians Monday.

Representatives for the Security Council’s 14 other members held a moment of silence for the victims Tuesday before Haley derided Hamas over their deaths.

“Make no mistake: Hamas is pleased with the results from yesterday,” she said, before detailing how it goaded protesters into entering dangerous areas along Israel’s southern border.

“I ask my colleagues here in the Security Council: Who among us would accept this type of activity on your border?” Haley continued. “No one would.”

“No country in this chamber would act with more restraint than Israel has. In fact, the records of several countries here today suggest they would be much less restrained.”

Mansour, who was an invited guest to Tuesday’s meeting, then compared the Gaza protests to anti-gun violence demonstrations in the U.S.

“We reject the racist discourse that turns us into excluded victims of humanity,” he said. “We have the right to demonstrate as families against the occupation and end its arrogance.”

Gaza burst into chaos Monday after the U.S. opened its Embassy in the contested city of Jerusalem.

President Trump recognized Jerusalem as Israel’s capital late last year, altering decades of American policy on the issue.

Israel considers Jerusalem its undivided capital, while the Palestinians hope that the eastern part of the city serves as the capital of their desired state.